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Privacy & Security

Security & Fraud Prevention

Fake Login Fiasco

Another great article from our friends on KnowBe4's Security Team

Scammers frequently try to trick you into clicking on malicious links in emails by making them appear legitimate. In a recent scam, they are trying to trick you with an email that appears to be related to your Microsoft account security. The email says that there has been some unusual activity on your account and that many of your account’s features have been locked. There is a link in the email, along with instructions to click it so that you can review all activity on your account.

If you click the link, you’ll be taken to what appears to be a Microsoft login page. However, the login page is actually fake, and you won’t be taken to your Microsoft account if you enter your login information here. Instead, entering your user credentials on this page will allow cybercriminals to steal them. Once they have your username and password, they can use them to access your account and steal your personal information.

Follow these tips to avoid falling victim to a phishing scam:

  • Scammers will often try to scare you into acting impulsively. Always stop and think before clicking, especially if an email is instructing you to act quickly.
  • Pay attention to the details of the email.  Phishing emails will often contain spelling and grammatical errors, or the wording of the email may seem unusual.
  • Navigate to the official website in your browser whenever possible.  Clicking a link in an email may direct you to a fake or malicious website.  
  • Keeping Your Passwords Squeaky Clean

    Another great article from our friends on KnowBe4's Security Team

    Did you know that the average person uses the same three to seven passwords to log in to over 170 online accounts? In addition to being reused, these passwords are often weak and can be easily guessed by cybercriminals. If cybercriminals guess these passwords, they could access the majority of their victim’s online accounts. Even worse, the victim may not know that their password has been compromised for several months or years. To keep your passwords squeaky clean and safe from cybercriminals, follow the tips below:

    Create Strong Passwords

    Creating strong passwords helps prevent cybercriminals from gaining access to your online accounts. Your passwords should be as long, complex, and random as possible. While many websites only require passwords to be eight characters long, we recommend making your password at least 12 characters long. You should also include a combination of lowercase and uppercase letters, numbers, and symbols in your password. To keep your accounts extra safe, you can use password phrases, or passphrases. However, when you create your password or passphrase, make sure that you don’t use any personal information that a cybercriminal could guess.

    Don't Reuse Passwords

    Reusing passwords for your online accounts may be convenient, but it’s also risky. If you reuse passwords, you could be at risk of having multiple accounts compromised at once. If a cybercriminal guesses your password, they could access multiple accounts instead of just one account. Cybercriminals can also sell passwords or make them available online. Creating a unique password for each online account reduces the risk if one of your passwords is compromised.

    Use a Password Manager

    You’re probably wondering how you are supposed to remember long, complex passwords for all of your online accounts. The answer is a password manager. You can use password managers to securely store all of your passwords. Instead of having to remember passwords for every online account, you only have to remember one password for your password manager. In addition to storing your passwords, many password managers can also generate passwords for you based on specific criteria.

    Use Multi-Factor Authentication

    You can also use multi-factor authentication (MFA) to secure your online accounts, if available. MFA requires multiple forms of authentication, such as a password and a code from your smartphone or a USB smart key. By requiring you to use multiple forms of authentication, cybercriminals will have a harder time gaining access to your account, even if your password is compromised.

    Nobody wants cybercriminals to guess their passwords. To keep your passwords squeaky clean and safe, remember to create strong passwords, avoid reusing passwords, and use a password manager or MFA, if possible.                 

     

    The KnowBe4 Security Team                 

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